Are you at risk for diabetes?

Are you at risk for diabetes?

Diabetes now affects nearly 10% of the U.S. population—that’s 30 million children and adults! According to the American Diabetes Association, another 86 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, the leading cause of kidney failure, doubling the risk for heart attack from heart disease.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels.

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults.

Find out if you are at risk:http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test/?loc=atrisk-slabnav

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ranks diabetes as one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. If it is not controlled, diabetes can cause serious health problems, including blindness, nerve damage and kidney disease.

If you have diabetes, your body has trouble turning glucose into energy, thus starving your body of energy which in turn damages certain systems.

You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you:

  • Are over age 40
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Have a parent or ibling with diabetes
  • Are African American, Hispanic or Latino, Native American, Alaska Native, Asian American, or Pacific Islander
  • Have had gestational diabetes or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Have polycystic ovary syndrome (when a woman’s body produces more male hormones than normal)
  • Have high blood pressure or high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol
  • Are physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Have prediabetes

Because symptoms of type 2 diabetes can be hard to spot, it’s important to talk with your doctor about your risk for type 2 diabetes. If you notice any symptoms, ask your doctor about getting tested.

Reminders can go a long way to help stick to a game plan for becoming healthier and reducing your risk for diabetes. Take a look at these 50 ways to prevent Type 2 Diabetes—Go ahead stick it on your refrigerator!

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/preventing-type-2-diabetes/50-ways

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